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Intro to the AIGA Educators Series

Written by
Ben Kiel
Published
January 3, 2016
Categories

Teaching is often wrapped up in the mechanics of the classroom, school, and calendar. It can be hard to find the time to take stock of a larger picture. With this series of articles we are giving educators a space and an invitation to reflect and share what they have learned through and about teaching with the rest of us.

The first two posts deal directly with taking stock. Jessa Wilcoxen, Associate Professor of Digital Media at Greenville College, discusses how to inspire students to reflect about how they use their skills to enact positive social change. Robert Lopez, Associate Professor of Design at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, reflects on a few lessons learned in his almost fifteen years of teaching.

We are looking for your submissions to this series, are you a professor or a professional who teaches and is passionate about design education? We invite you to submit written reflections, analysis, or case studies that give insight into this evolving field. Topics can include but should not be limited to:

  • Perceptions on the Industry or Future
  • Teaching Strategies
  • Assessment
  • Experimental Curriculum
  • Scholarship or Research
  • Design for Good
  • AIGA Student Groups
  • K-12 Initiatives

Articles should be between 500 and 1000 words and be submitted to our Editor, Robert Lopez at roblopez@siu.edu

If you have a few article concepts, contact Rob and he will help you choose what best fits the tone of our online publication and provide additional guidelines.

Respectfully,

Jessa Wilcoxen, AIGA St. Louis Mentorship Chair
Associate Professor of Digital Media, Greenville College

Robert A. Lopez, AIGA Development Chair
Associate Professor of Design, Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Ben Kiel, AIGA St. Louis Education Chair
Adjunct Lecturer, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts
Washington University in St. Louis

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